So a few of you have asked me how I dry brush paint on my cars to get the color to change. It's pretty simple and I think when folks hear me say "dry brush" they picture in their minds something I would call highlighting. Where light colored paint is used on all the raised details of a car to make them "pop" (hate that word). Made famous and ridiculously overused by a few well known weatherers out there. I've never "highlighted" any of my cars. I'll depend on my good friend light to do that for me. Usually sunlight works well but indoor lighting will do in a pinch.

I started doing this way back on the GT car mainly because I began to notice that when I would fade my cars with my air brush, they had a tendency to end up looking uniform in color and fade. I was going for an anti-freezer-pop look here. In real life, how many faded cars do you see that are faded uniformly? For every one that you show me I can show you hundreds that aren't.

After a while I realized that I could slightly change the color of my models with the same technique. Instead of using white or a lighter shade of my model color for a fade, I could use different colors to get different looks. On the NW hood,(Soon to be posted on TWS), I could go from black to gray to green to leathery brownish color and have hints of green, black AND gray show through. This, to me, is a much more realistic look for a model. It is after all what you see in real life, isn't it? I call this color modulation. I am sure there are some out there that have heard this term before.

On the Noodle I used the same technique to gradually change the color of the car from top to bottom. From rusty brown on the top to a gradually clean car on the bottom, color graduation. So, there are three major ways that I dry brush paint on my car. Here I'll show you how I put a simple fade on a dark colored car using white paint. This took me about 5 minutes while I listened to Gary tell me how I'm the greatest weatherer he's ever seen... Good, you haven't fallen asleep yetÖ







So, first picture. These are the brushes I use for this. From left to right we have a #4 Filbert, a 5/8th inch 4135 Angular Shader, another 5/8th inch Angular Shader this one with 322 on the handle. (I have no idea what the numbers mean but the blue one is a little larger than the purple one. ) And a #4 Fan Blender.
THIS LITTLE HOW-TO WAS POSTED BY JEREMY ON OUR FORUM THIS PAST JANUARY BECAUSE SOME FOLKS WERE ASKING HIM HOW HE DID HIS FADES.  HERE IT IS IN CASE SOME OF YOU HAVENíT MADE IT TO THE FORUM JUST YET. I AM SURE THAT THIS ISNíT EXACTLY GROUNDBREAKING MATERIAL BUT IF ITíS THE FIRST TIME YOUíRE SEEING IT, PASS IT ALONG AND BE SURE TO MENTION WHERE YOU GOT IT.
Here's the paint I like to use. It's a little easier to work with than Titanium white because I've noticed a bluish hue to Titanium white.
So, we take our Filbert and more or less put some paint on our model. I've heard this called "blocking" but I like to call it "putting paint on my model".
Next we work our way up the brush food chain, smaller to larger and softer. In comes the 5/8 purple.
We work the paint up and down. Left to right. What we're doing is taking paint back off the car. Leaving a nice thin layer.

The larger 5/8th blue...
And finally the Fan. With this one we are kind of lightly brushing the car, trying to make sure all the brush strokes are gone and that the finish is kinda even. At this step I'll turn the brush on it's side and use up and down strokes to take a bit more paint off of areas that I don't want the paint to adhere to. Leaving an uneven fade. The red brush is good for this or sometimes even a smaller filbert.
And the end result...
I did half the car for illustrative purposes...

The white paint that is left in the cracks and crevices will more than likely be covered up by a micro wash of burnt umber or raw umber. If the sight of it bothers you so before you come to this step, you can always go back over these areas with a toothpick and remove this left over paint.

As I said, I don't really think this is somewthing that many of you have never seen before, I am simply putting it out there for those who have not. If you would like to see more little how to's like this one, sign up at The Rustbucket Forum and check us out.


Thanks For Checking In.

Jeremy St. Peter